Utility links
Social Studies
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Social Studies 10

Who were the people who came to Canada? Why would anyone come to a country that was virtually wilderness? Where would you choose to live in Canada? Why? Who made the decisions to split the country into regions? If you were able to travel back in time to Confederation, what advice might you give the β€˜citizens’ of Canada? Is western Canada still only a resource based economy? Canadian history and Canadian geography are the key units in this course. Eastern Canadian history from the War of 1812 to Confederation; Western Canadian history from the fur trade to immigrant settlement of the Plains, and British Columbia history from Contact to Confederation. The Geography units examine Canada’s economic regions and trade patterns.

Social Studies Explorations 11

Tired of learning about the past?  This current event based course explores major events that have occurred during your life, laws that affect you, cultures that you interact with, and the environment in which you live.

History 12

There has never been a more important time in History.  This course will allow you to study, analyse, and form opinions on current events and the last 100 years of world history.​

Genocide

More than 40 million people in the last century have died as a result of genocide.  By looking at specific examples, the course will explore how and why these acts of genocide occurred and keep occurring in the modern world.  

Comparative Civilizations 12

Have you dreamed of visiting the great places in history, where generations of people shaped the great civilizations with religion, art, architecture, philosophy, technology, music and adventure over the past 2500 years? Are you interested in experiencing this study in new and sometimes hands-on way? Are you Interested in visiting the Vancouver Art Gallery, or sitting in on a symphony performed by the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra? Are you interested in learning this in a demanding and intellectually challenging course, but one that leads us to a deeper, more sophisticated understanding, not only of our world but ultimately of ourselves? Come span 2500 years from the birth of the great civilizations of the past right to our world of today! Come to Comparative Civilizations 12! 

Geography 12

Do you like to see things blow up?  Interested how ski hills are created?
Have an interest in mountains, jungles, deserts, animals, and glaciers kilometers high? Do you like to discuss global issues? Want to explore some of the most interesting places to travel? Love / hate getting lost? Like building things? Well Geography 12 is the course for you.  Here, science and the humanities meet in a fantastic five-month exploration of the charted and uncharted places on our planet all the while learning how we, as humans, fi t into this global adventure story. We study locations, environments, resources, and people, locally and internationally. Get ready for the 21st century and have fun doing it. It’s not just about maps anymore!

Law 12

Is Law a road to riches and fame or is it a road to help people? Law 12 develops students’ understandings of the operation of our legal system, including how laws are made, administered, and changed. The course enables students to use legal mechanisms to enforce rights and fulfill responsibilities. The course should promote a greater understanding of the variety of personal and shared attitudes that exist in society and how these attitudes may influence and sometimes come into conflict with our laws. Topics include: Introduction to Law, Lawmakers and Lawmaking, Civil Rights, Introduction to Criminal Law, Criminal law procedures, offenses, defenses, sentencing, Young Offenders Act, Civil Procedure, Torts, Contracts, Human Rights, Family Law, Wills & Estates, Labour Law.

Criminology 101

Introduction to Criminology
(through NIC offered as an Independent Directed Study)
Criminology 101 is an introduction to the core concepts, basic data sources and general research findings in the field of Criminology.  A key focus is on elements of continuity and discontinuity between traditional and contemporary theories of crime, deviance, criminality and social control.  Particular attention is paid to the Canadian context.  Pre-requisite a "C" in English 12.  
See Ms. Camerin to apply.  Applications are due no later than May 31, 2018.  Students will be required to purchase their books and pay NISU fees and Learner Resource Fees.  SD72 may assist with the cost of tuition.
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​​At Issue 10

Social Studies 10/ English 10/ Independent Directed Study 10
 (2 blocks,12 credits)
"History will be kind to me for I intend to write it."
With its focus on historical and contemporary social, cultural, political, legal, economic, and environmental issues, this literary study will prepare students for their future lives as Global citizens and members of the International community.   This course will combine Social Studies 10 and English 10, along with the opportunity to engage in an independent directed study based off of the course curriculum all in the same semester.  The Social Studies 10 portion of the course will cover a vast amount of information, and the skills students will learn through English 10 will not only prepare them for the Provincial Assessment, but also how to analyze information, concisely convey ideas, and communicate effectively.  β€‹


Civics 11

Civics is the study of how people use politics, laws, words, actions, and media to govern themselves.  Are we selective judges of what is important, based on what we choose to watch or listen to?  Do we act towards our fellow human beings with measured empathy? Are we possibly fatigued or overwhelmed with information about challenges and changes in our world? Do we as individuals feel powerless, even in our democracy to enact meaningful   change? Are we influenced to 'think' about local, global, national events by media, including social media? We will consider how politics, laws, words, actions and media presently are and evaluate possible alternative approaches. Finally, we will analyze what it means to an active citizen, both nationally and globally. An inquiry approach to some topics will be used. Participation and class attendance is mandatory for this course.​

At Issue 12

​History 12/English 12/Independent Directed Study 12
 (2 blocks,12 credits)
With its focus on historical and contemporary social, cultural, political, legal, economic, and environmental issues, this literary study will prepare students for their future lives as Global citizens and members of the International community.   This course will combine History 12 and English 12, along with the opportunity to engage in an independent directed study based off of the course curriculum all in the same semester.  The History 12 portion of the course will cover a vast amount of information, and the skills students will learn through English 12 will not only prepare them for the Provincial Assessment, but also how to analyze information, concisely convey ideas, and communicate effectively. 
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Middle Earth 12

(only offered through Outdoor Adventures Program)
Focus on broad Humanities outcomes with key literary examples drawn from Tolkien's Middle Earth, local writers and environments, and other Sci-Fi fiction. Our topics include: Folklore and Mythology, Medievalism, Technology,  Origin of Languages, Invented Architecture, Fantasy Maps, Mythical Beasts,  Fan Fiction, Cultural Anthropology, Cuisine, Writing for an Audience and Connections to Nature (e.g. Herbology), and the History Behind Famous Tales. Examples will be taken from diverse sources (e.g. Norse, Greek, First Nations, Chinese, etc.) and will include both the real world and imagined worlds (from literature, film, and games). Student choice for major assignments, no provincial or school exam, more project-based. Designed for students who read well, or can synthesize ideas across many subject areas​.

Social Justice 12

Social justice issues are interconnected and complex.  Our own backgrounds, biases and beliefs about what is fair or equal for many issues are determined by a personal set of values, and ethics.  What are your biases, beliefs and values?
Social Justice and Inhumanity will examine privilege and power issues that set the stage for economic, political, social and cultural injustice.  The power of social activism may impact and can transform individuals and systems. 
Past and present injustices in Canada and the world will be part of an inquiry for students.  Understanding the intent (of an action or event or law) and then to determine what is unjust, why it is unjust and how might we problem solve to improve/change the situation.  Students who wish to be involved active citizens in their communities or globally will have some self-determination of a particular study and action plan.